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Posts tagged “griots

ΠΩΣ ΣΤΡΕΦΕΙΣ ΤΗΝ ΚΟΙΝΗ ΓΝΩΜΗ ΕΝΑΝΤΙΑ ΣΤΟΥΣ ΔΙΑΔΗΛΩΤΕΣ

Πως καθοδηγείς την κοινή γνώμη ενάντια στους διαδηλωτές –
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με αφορμή την συνέντευξη του Francesco Cossiga στην ιταλική εφημερίδα “Il Giorno”
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Απλά μαθήματα κυβερνητικής από τον πρώην πρωθυπουργό και πρόεδρο της Ιταλικής Δημοκρατίας Φραγκίσκο Κοσίγκα.

Προσέξτε τι λέει:

Firstly, forget the high-school students… can you imagine what would happen if a 10-year-old kid got killed or seriously injured…

Let them get on with it. Withdraw the police from the streets and the universities, infiltrate the movement with agents provocateurs ready for anything, and allow the demonstrators to run loose for a week or so, devastating shops, setting cars on fire and causing havoc in the streets.

Then, with public opinion on your side, the sound of ambulance sirens should drown out the sirens of police and carabinieri cars.

In the sense that the forces of law and order should massacre the demonstrators without pity and send them all to hospital. Not arrest them – the magistrates would set them free straight away in any event… beat them bloody and beat the teachers storring them up bloody too.

The teacher above all. Not the older ones, of course… the young girls. Have you any idea of the seriousness of what’s happening? There are teachers indoctrinating children and encouraging them to demonstrate – that’s criminal behaviour!

Ιt’s the democratic way – put out the flame before the fire spreads.

I’m not exaggerating when I say I truly believe that terrorism will return to bloody the streets of this country. And I wouldn’t want people to forget that the Red Brigades (BR) were not born in the factories but in the universities. And that the slogans they used were used before them by the Student Movement and the trade union left.

The history will repeat itself: It’s not possible, it’s probable. That’s why I’m saying: let’s not forget that the BR were born because the flame was not put out in time.

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Είπατε τίποτα ?

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ΠΗΓΗ:

http://www.anarkismo.net/

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ολόκληρο το δημοσίευμα:

An interview with Francesco Cossiga

Friday October 24, 2008 12:35
by Andrea Cangini

Former Italian Home Secretary, Prime Minister and President

The proposed education reform (known as the Gelmini Law, after the current Education Minister) is provoking enormous reaction from students, parents and teachers and many schools and universities have been occupied by protesters in recent days. Two days ago, Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi threatened to restore order by sending in the police (which he subsequently denied, despite documentary evidence). The following interview from yesterday’s “Quotidiano nazionale” with former Italian President, Francesco Cossiga, is a good indicator of the current mood in the country. (Introduction by Anarkismo.net)


An interview with Francesco Cossiga

by Andrea Cangini for “Quotidiano nazionale” (Il Giorno/Il Resto del Carlino/La Nazione), 23.10.2008
President Cossiga, do you think that Berlusconi has gone too far in threatening the use of State force against the students?

That depends, if he believes he is the Prime Minister of a strong State then no, he was right. But as Italy is a weak State, as the opposition is no longer the rock-like PCI [1] but the evanescent PD [2], I’m afraid that his words will not be followed by action and that Berlusconi will just end up with egg on his face.

What should happen now?

At this point, Maroni [3] should do what I did when I was Home Secretary.

What’s that?

Firstly, forget the high-school students… can you imagine what would happen if a 10-year-old kid got killed or seriously injured…

Instead, the university students?

Let them get on with it. Withdraw the police from the streets and the universities, infiltrate the movement with agents provocateurs ready for anything, and allow the demonstrators to run loose for a week or so, devastating shops, setting cars on fire and causing havoc in the streets.

Then what?Then, with public opinion on your side, the sound of ambulance sirens should drown out the sirens of police and carabinieri cars.

In the sense that…

In the sense that the forces of law and order should massacre the demonstrators without pity and send them all to hospital. Not arrest them – the magistrates would set them free straight away in any event… beat them bloody and beat the teachers storring them up bloody too.

The teachers, too?

The teacher above all. Not the older ones, of course… the young girls. Have you any idea of the seriousness of what’s happening? There are teachers indoctrinating children and encouraging them to demonstrate – that’s criminal behaviour!

But you realise what they would say in Europe after something like you suggest? “Fascism returns to Italy”, they’d say.

Rubbish, it’s the democratic way – put out the flame before the fire spreads.

What fire?

I’m not exaggerating when I say I truly believe that terrorism will return to bloody the streets of this country. And I wouldn’t want people to forget that the Red Brigades (BR) were not born in the factories but in the universities. And that the slogans they used were used before them by the Student Movement and the trade union left.

So you think it is possible that history will repeat itself?

It’s not possible, it’s probable. That’s why I’m saying: let’s not forget that the BR were born because the flame was not put out in time.

Veltroni’s PD is on the side of the demonstrators.

Look, I can’t in all honesty see Veltroni taking to the streets and risk getting a cracked skull. You’re more likely to see him in some exclusive club in Chicago, applauding Obama.

He won’t take to the streets with a stick in his hands, sure, but politically…

Politically, he’s making the same mistake that the PCI made when the troubles [4] started: it backed the movement, deluding itself that it could control it, but when it too became a target, as was bound to happen, it soon changed its mind. The so-called hard-line adopted by Andreotti, Zaccagnini and me was suggested by Berlinguer [5]… But today we’ve got the PD, an ectoplasm led by another ectoplasm. And that’s another good reason for Berlusconi to be more prudent.
Translated by nmcn

Translator notes:
1. Italian Communist Party, which changed name and broke up in 1991.
2. Democratic Party, led by Walter Veltroni, formed in 2007 from the remains of the old PCI together with other centre-left forces.
3. Roberto Maroni (Lega Nord), current Home Minister.
4. The “contestazione”, a widespread progressive protest movement which began in the late 1960s.
5. Leader of the PCI from 1972 to 1984.

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Manipulating protesters

Manipulating Protesters

An apocalyptic interview with Francesco Cossiga

Friday October 24, 2008 12:35
by Andrea Cangini
Source : http://www.anarkismo.net/

Former Italian Home Secretary, Prime Minister and President

The proposed education reform (known as the Gelmini Law, after the current Education Minister) is provoking enormous reaction from students, parents and teachers and many schools and universities have been occupied by protesters in recent days. Two days ago, Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi threatened to restore order by sending in the police (which he subsequently denied, despite documentary evidence). The following interview from yesterday’s “Quotidiano nazionale” with former Italian President, Francesco Cossiga, is a good indicator of the current mood in the country. (Introduction by Anarkismo.net)


An interview with Francesco Cossiga

by Andrea Cangini for “Quotidiano nazionale” (Il Giorno/Il Resto del Carlino/La Nazione), 23.10.2008
President Cossiga, do you think that Berlusconi has gone too far in threatening the use of State force against the students?

That depends, if he believes he is the Prime Minister of a strong State then no, he was right. But as Italy is a weak State, as the opposition is no longer the rock-like PCI [1] but the evanescent PD [2], I’m afraid that his words will not be followed by action and that Berlusconi will just end up with egg on his face.

What should happen now?

At this point, Maroni [3] should do what I did when I was Home Secretary.

What’s that?

Firstly, forget the high-school students… can you imagine what would happen if a 10-year-old kid got killed or seriously injured…

Instead, the university students?

Let them get on with it. Withdraw the police from the streets and the universities, infiltrate the movement with agents provocateurs ready for anything, and allow the demonstrators to run loose for a week or so, devastating shops, setting cars on fire and causing havoc in the streets.

Then what?Then, with public opinion on your side, the sound of ambulance sirens should drown out the sirens of police and carabinieri cars.

In the sense that…

In the sense that the forces of law and order should massacre the demonstrators without pity and send them all to hospital. Not arrest them – the magistrates would set them free straight away in any event… beat them bloody and beat the teachers storring them up bloody too.

The teachers, too?

The teacher above all. Not the older ones, of course… the young girls. Have you any idea of the seriousness of what’s happening? There are teachers indoctrinating children and encouraging them to demonstrate – that’s criminal behaviour!

But you realise what they would say in Europe after something like you suggest? “Fascism returns to Italy”, they’d say.

Rubbish, it’s the democratic way – put out the flame before the fire spreads.

What fire?

I’m not exaggerating when I say I truly believe that terrorism will return to bloody the streets of this country. And I wouldn’t want people to forget that the Red Brigades (BR) were not born in the factories but in the universities. And that the slogans they used were used before them by the Student Movement and the trade union left.

So you think it is possible that history will repeat itself?

It’s not possible, it’s probable. That’s why I’m saying: let’s not forget that the BR were born because the flame was not put out in time.

Veltroni’s PD is on the side of the demonstrators.

Look, I can’t in all honesty see Veltroni taking to the streets and risk getting a cracked skull. You’re more likely to see him in some exclusive club in Chicago, applauding Obama.

He won’t take to the streets with a stick in his hands, sure, but politically…

Politically, he’s making the same mistake that the PCI made when the troubles [4] started: it backed the movement, deluding itself that it could control it, but when it too became a target, as was bound to happen, it soon changed its mind. The so-called hard-line adopted by Andreotti, Zaccagnini and me was suggested by Berlinguer [5]… But today we’ve got the PD, an ectoplasm led by another ectoplasm. And that’s another good reason for Berlusconi to be more prudent.
Translated by nmcn

Translator notes:
1. Italian Communist Party, which changed name and broke up in 1991.
2. Democratic Party, led by Walter Veltroni, formed in 2007 from the remains of the old PCI together with other centre-left forces.
3. Roberto Maroni (Lega Nord), current Home Minister.
4. The “contestazione”, a widespread progressive protest movement which began in the late 1960s.
5. Leader of the PCI from 1972 to 1984.


“Greek Teenagers” by Nikos Raptis

Greek Teenagers

By Nikos Raptis

As always, to understand what is going on today (Dec.11, ’08) in Greece (or any place) one has to go back in time a few decades. Let us make the effort.

A few weeks after the “departure”, in 1974, of the US-supported dictatorship in Greece, I was in the luxurious ground floor of the Bank of Greece where I was filling some forms to secure the necessary exchange for the purchase of a book from a US publisher. I was sitting at a long heavy table. It was early in the day, there were not many people in the huge ground floor and the two security policemen there came and sat at the other end of the table and started chatting. I was wearing a US-made sport jacket. They took me for a foreigner and started talking freely. The older (fat) one says: “So, Karamanlis came from Paris [after the dictatorship] and instead of giving us money, the asshole bought helmets and riot gear for us”. That, Karamanlis, was the uncle of the (rather rotund) present Karamanlis, the Prime Minister of Greece. Karamanlis, the uncle, is referred to as the “Ethnarch” [the “father” of the nation]. Actually, he was a US-chosen rightist proxy to administer Greece on behalf of the US in the early 1950s. He died a few years ago and he demanded that his corpse be buried in a private lot on which a memorial building was erected mimicking the building of the usual “presidential library” of the US Presidents. The burial in a private space is illegal in Greece.

Six years after the above dialogue, between the two policemen, in November 1980, the riot police attack the demonstrators that were marching towards the US Embassy during the yearly march commemorating the 1973 uprising of the students against the dictatorship. The Karamanlis [uncle] police kill 26-year-old Iakovos Koumis and Stamatina Kanellopoulou, a young worker, by crushing their skulls.

In 1981 the “socialists” (PASOK) win the elections. Andreas Papandreou, the US educated professor of economics at Berkley, becomes Prime Minister. His first act: he DOUBLES the salaries of the policemen! Four years later, in 1985, the Papandreou police kill 15-year-old Michael Kaltezas by shooting him in the back of his head, again during the yearly demonstration of the uprising. The killer is acquitted. That same year, Catharine John Bool [spelling?], a 22-year-old American is killed by the Greek police, for refusing to have her car searched by them. Around that period a young Turkish man is beaten to death in an Athens police station. The Greek press never includes his name in the usual list of persons killed by the Greek police. This list consists of the names of about one hundred persons killed by the “socialist” or the rightist police, from 1974 to this day. Not a single policeman was ever convicted. The latest murder is that of the 15-year-old Alexis Gregoropoulos, son of an upper middle class family, six days ago in Athens.

The Greek people, early on, had adopt the “battle-cry”: “Coppers Pigs Murderers!”

For 34 years, from 1974 to 2008, the Greek politicians, both “socialists” and rightists, as expected, have stolen millions of dollars from the money of the state [that is of the Greek taxpayers]. The latest scandal, in the tune of tens of millions of Euros, involves the government of Karamanlis [nephew] and the pious monks of a monastery on the “Sacred Mount of Athos”. It is quite interesting [or quite amusing] how the “professional” Christians bestow sacredness to all kinds of material entities. For example, the above monks, besides living on a sacred mountain, they claim to have the “Sacred Belt” that belonged to the Virgin Mary mother of Jesus, the son of God.

Today these Greek politicians, mostly US-educated and some of them from Harvard or the London School of Economics, have managed to bring the young Greeks who have a university degree in engineering, or in medicine, or in law, etc to the point of a yearly income of about US $ 12,000, if they are lucky to have a job. While life in Greece is as expensive, if not more expensive, than life in Berlin or Paris.

Inevitably, the killing of the teenager was apt to cause an “explosion”. The important new development, compared to previous “explosions”, was that it spread as a revolt all over Greece. Usually, in the past, the violent demonstrations took place in Athens and Salonica.

Here is a very brief recording of what happened after the killing of the 15-year-old Alexis:

–  On Thursday, Dec. 4, there are country-wide demonstrations by students protesting the attempt of the rightist government to downgrade the state-supported public universities. The police, in Athens, beat severely a student who is hospitalized with heavy injuries. On the same day, 3,500 farmers of central Greece block with their cars and their trucks the main North-South highway of Greece, cutting the country in two, protesting the policies of the government that have turned them into heavily debt-ridden paupers.

–  On Saturday, Dec. 6, Alexis is killed 25 minutes after 9 p.m., in cold blood, according to half a dozen eye witnesses. One hour later a violent reaction by the direct-action faction of Greek anarchists is initiated in Athens and eight more cities in Greece. The fight against the police goes on all night long.

–  On Sunday, Dec. 7, around midday a crowd assembles in front of the Athens National Archaeological Museum [a building visited by millions of US citizens during the last 50 years]. The call to assemble was done through the Internet and SMSs. The crowd starts marching peacefully. After a little they clash with the police and the crowd starts burning mostly banks, car dealerships and big businesses. This goes on all night.

–  On Monday, Dec. 8, around 6 p.m.a huge crowd of thousands of people gather at the central building of the University of Athens. Even before the crowd starts to march there are violent contacts with the police. Burning and breaking of shop windows goes on all night long. The same happens in 19 more cities and towns of the country.

–  On Tuesday, Dec. 9, around 12 noon a huge crowd of pupils, students, high school teachers, university professors start to demonstrate. There are clashes with the police. Later in the afternoon the funeral of Alexis is attended by about 4,000 people. The police attacks them. Riots go on all through the night. Looting starts, mostly by immigrants, who do not take part in the riots, and by some Greeks. The same holds for most Greek cities and towns.

–  On Wednesday, Dec. 10, there is a General Strike all over the country. The rioters this time are mostly pupils and students. They attack mostly police stations hurtling, eggs, tomatoes, bitter oranges [also known as Seville oranges], and stones.

– Today, Thursday, Dec. 11, it is mostly pupils and students (14 to 17-year-olds, boys and girls) attacking police stations again with the above mentioned missiles. A few blocks from my place at Halandri, in Athens, the police station is being attacked by high school kids Also, today, there is a tally of the damage done during the riots. Around 565 shops were damaged or completely destroyed, hundreds arrested (half of them looting immigrants), an estimated US $ 1 billion plus in damages, and (most important) 4,200 units of police chemicals spent indiscriminately against Greek citizens, raising the need to buy more chemicals from…Israel!

Now let us try to find out the meaning of this revolt:

But first an important parenthesis:

[Parenthesis: In the central hall of the police station of the Athens neighborhood that I was raised, there is a huge slab of white marble fixed on one of the walls with about a dozen names engraved on it. The names belonged to policemen who were executed in the police station the very first day of the December 1944 uprising of what is known as the “Greek Civil War” after the end of the Nazi occupation of Greece. The executed policemen were anti-communist Nazi collaborators and brutal torturers of members of  the anti-Nazi Resistance, mostly communists.

To try to persuade people about the existence of police brutality is rather redundant. Recent cases as the sodomizing of the young black in a Manhattan subway station, or the revelations about the master-torturer police officer in Chicago are a minuscule recording of what is going on in police stations all over the face of the earth. So, no wonder that the first people to be punished during an uprising are the brutal policemen. The above marble slab is just a simple example.]

The groups that took part in the uprising after the murder of the 15-year-old kid are the following:

–  A minuscule part of direct-action anarchists.

–  A group of non-violent anarchists spread all over Greece, numbering in the hundreds.

– The usual police “plants” in the anarchist groups.

–  A very dangerous group of police officers, of the Blackwater-type of individuals [assisted by neo-Nazis], masquerading as anarchists. [See below].

–  The “KKE” (Communist Party of Greece), “traditional” communists, numbering in the hundreds of thousands.

–  The “Coalition of the Radical Left” (“Coalition” from now on). A formerly Eurocommunist split from KKE, numbering, now, in the hundreds of thousands.

–  The “Greens”, numbering in the thousands

–  University students, numbering in the tens of thousands.

–  High school kids, numbering in the hundreds of thousands.

[The numbering refers to the power of each group in general and does not refer to the number of persons that took part in the uprising.]

The burning and breaking was done by the direct-action anarchists, the Blackwater-type pigs [assisted by the neo-Nazis], and some students and pupils.

The KKE masses demonstrated in the traditional way of marching in extreme discipline and departed. They carried the usual red flags, however the flagpoles were of the size and strength of baseball bats. This was a warning to the pigs and their political choreographers, that they meant business. The pigs got the message.

The Coalition people and the Greens demonstrated in the traditional way but they were there to assist the up-risen youths.

The uprising was carried out by the students and the teenagers, especially the teenagers!

What is of paramount importance is not the journalistic reporting or the burning, the looting, etc, but the incidents, events, and statements that show what is happening in the Greek society now. Here are some of these events:

–  The head of the National Federation of Traders, Demitris Armenakis, representing the owners of the shops that were destroyed said: “No (material) damage can be compared to the life of a young man”. This moral statement, coming from a person that suffered material damage, has impressed most Greeks.

–  From some police stations the information leaked out that some of the policemen demanded and succeeded to take the guns out of the hands of their violent-prone colleagues.

–  At some point ordinary citizens of all ages who usually are fence-sitters were so angry with the behavior of the police during the demonstrations by the young that they tried to intervene and protect the kids. Some of the parents of the younger kids did the same, placing their bodies between their kids and the clubs of the pigs.

–  Today, a deputy of the Greek parliament, belonging to the Coalition, walking with two friends on a side-street of the area of the riots spotted two muscular men wearing hoods who were holding stones and carrying sticks. The deputy asked them if they were policemen. They answered angrily that they were policemen, so what. The deputy and his friends chased them, but their age did not allow them to catch the young braves. This was described, publicly, in the evening news.

–  In a very unfortunate moment, the General Secretary of KKE accused the Coalition that they “caress the ears ” of the hooded persons that burn and destroy. Even more unfortunate is the fact that the KKE and the Coalition leaderships have a decades long enmity that is based partly in personal antipathies.

– The usual 1/3 of a any given population, that consider themselves conservative, that is crypto-fascist, still consider the up-risen kids and the murdered child as “punks”, “brats”, “dirty bastards”, and regard the murderer policeman as a hero.

–  Two well known lawyers initially accepted the defense of the murderer, but after talking to him they declined to represent him. Eventually, a lawyer, by the name of Alexis Kougias, who has been in the forefront of the news for various reasons for almost a decade, accepted the job. Kougias stated publicly that the death of the kid was a “misinterpretation”, that the death was the “will of God”, and it is the job of the court to decide “if the death should have happened”. We think that the case of Kougias is of great interest not only for the Greek society but also for the international community of intellectuals, university students, and ordinary people. We suggest that the Kougias case should be followed closely by all.

The conclusion drawn from the incidents of these six days in Greece : The uprising was in reality the uprising of the Greek teenagers. It was a Greek “intifada”. The “weapons” used by the teenagers in this “intifada” were their burning anger, their maturity, and predominately… Seville oranges, the traditional Greek student weapon against the police. Their targets were the police stations. The police stations, whose historical meaning was touched briefly in the above parenthesis.

What might one expect after the “intifada” of the Greek teenagers? The rightist government of Karamanlis (the nephew) is mortally wounded. The “socialists” have been so corrupt during their two decades-long governing of the country that the young Greeks are repelled by them. What the kids are looking towards, are: the anarchists, the Coalition, and the KKE. Also, to a lesser degree towards the Greens.

A year ago the Coalition’s voting power was a little above 3%. A few months ago it rose to almost 16%. Now it is back at about 9%. The KKE for years was constantly around 5%. Now it is close to 7%. The Greens seem to reach close to 3%. It is reasonable to expect that in the next elections the Left (Coalition, KKE, Greens) could achieve a total voting power of around 20% and even much more.

If the above estimates are correct, then the “intifada” of the Greek teenagers will give a hard time to the CIA analysts in Langley. These analysts initiated the 1967 dictatorship of the colonels. The result was that in 1974 the Communist Party was legal after decades of being outlawed. The murder of Alexis by a “copy” of a US “Rambo”-policeman that initiated the “intifada” of the Greek teenagers, could give birth to a new Left in Greece. Also, this is a very good opportunity for the Parecon vision to be promoted among the Greek teens. It seems that the Coalition has an affinity to the Parecon vision.

We shall see what happens. Let us hope that my estimate is correct.

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Nikos Raptis was born in Athens, Greece, in 1930. He is a civil engineer. For the last 40 years he has been writing on social matters for papers and magazines (mainly) in Greece. He is the author of “Let Us Talk About Earthquakes, Floods and…the Streetcar” (1981) and “The Nightmare of the Nukes”(1986), both in Greek. He, also, translated into Greek and published Noam Chomsky’s “Year 501”, “Rethinking Camelot” and translated Michael Albert’s “Parecon: Life After Capitalism”. Also, he was a contributor to the book “The Media and the Kosovo Crisis”, edited by Philip Hammond and Edward S. Hermam. He lives in Athens, Greece.


Theo Angelopoulos: «I manganelli non servono nel paese c’è vero disagio»

Theo Angelopoulos: «I manganelli non servono nel paese c’è vero disagio»

di Malcom Pagani

ARTICLE ORIGINAL PUBLISHED in © 2008 L’Unità.it Nuova Iniziativa Editoriale Spa p.iva 13199630156

Il tema nascosto di tutto il suo cinema, l’enfasi di un potere inadeguato a relazionarsi col circostante, deflagra in immagini disperanti. Oltre i fumi delle barricate, i 73 anni di Theo Angelopoulos appaiono una convenzione. La voce toccata, l’attenzione desta. «Sono molto preoccupato, triste, spaventato, deluso. Passano i decenni, non impariamo nulla». A Monaco di Baviera per lavoro, il maestro greco già palma d’oro a Cannes nel ‘98, segue senza sospensioni il passo degli eventi.«La responsabilità di ciò che sta accadendo è interamente del governo greco e del Premier Karamanlis. Impressiona l’universalità della risposta, sempre la stessa, dai tempi dei colonnelli. Davanti a un disagio reale, ecco entrare in scena manganelli e lacrimogeni. Una grande nazione, quando possiede anticorpi che derivano dalla sua stessa storia, utilizza altri sistemi».La protesta sta travalicando i confini.
«Non poteva essere altrimenti. A Berlino hanno occupato il consolato, osservo in tv fotogrammi spaventosi. La faccia di quel ragazzino a terra, Grigoropulos, i suoi quindici anni buttati via, i sogni sul selciato, la violenza che non sa ascoltare altra ragione che la propria. Elementi che getterebbero nella preoccupazione chiunque, non soltanto chi ha lottato per la democrazia».

Gli scontri sono ripresi anche a Salonicco, set di tanti suoi film.
«Mi hanno chiamato anche da lì, la rivolta non finirà in poche ore, questo è certo. Ma l’aggressività giovanile va letta in controluce. È la spia di una collera che trova radici nella situazione economica della Grecia, nella sua classe politica squalificata, nella cristallizzazione dell’esistente. Per recedere da quest’immobilità, invece degli idranti, bisognerebbe mettere in campo una proposta, una concreta volontà di cambiamento, un segnale di discontinuità».

Come spesso accade, i primi fuochi si sono accesi tra i banchi di scuola.
«L’università e l’educazione sono le radici su cui edificare il sentire comune. Pensare di derubricarli a questioni secondarie, denuncia la miopia e l’arroganza di chi è abituato a trattare ambiti così importanti con consumato disprezzo».

C’è, in queste ore difficili, un dato che la inquieta più di altri?
«L’incapacità di capire la gioventù. Dovrebbe essere la discussione prìncipe su cui pianificare il futuro, la problematica che soppianta la vacuità del quotidiano e l’inseguirsi scontato di notizie inutili. Invece nulla, solo parole vuote e imbarazzato silenzio. Una sconfitta totale, l’ennesima cui assisto nella mia vita»


Θόδωρος Αγγελόπουλος: Η ανικανότητα να καταλάβουμε τη νεολαία…

0204_trilogy_051

Για άλλη μια φορά ο Αγγελόπουλος με συγκινεί.

Προσδιορίζει το συλλογικό πολιτικά. Μιλάει για την Ελλάδα και η μνήμη του δίνει τους προσδιορισμούς του χώρου και την περιπέτεια των ελλήνων.

Κοιτάζει από μακριά – βαθιά. Στα έργα του ποτέ δεν ξέχασε την ιστορία του τόπου, μιλάει και περιφέρεται σε αυτήν με παράμετρο πόνου και πάθους.

Η μεγάλη πληγή, ο Θίασος, ερμήνευσε πολύ πρόωρα ότι συνέβαινε και ότι παρακολουθούμε να επαναλαμβάνεται.

Η “αντίληψη της δημοκρατίας” στον Αγγελόπουλο περνάει μέσα από τους ψιθύρους και τiς ακροάσεις, της Αριστεράς – κατά τα λεγόμενα του – και οπωσδήποτε φέρει το βάρος και την ευθύνη και ο ίδιος για τον χώρο αυτό που ποτέ δεν πέτυχε να καθορίσει οριστικά τα γεγονότα στην πατρίδα του,
τουλάχιστον με τον τρόπο που ο ίδιος υπερασπίστηκε
.

Για το δημοσίευμα στην “Oυνιτά” ενημερώθηκα απ’το blog The Uncut’s Store Weblog – Your Music + Movie Experience και ευχαριστώ τους δημιουργούς του που το ξεχώρισαν και το δημοσίευσαν.
worldcity

Η ανικανότητα να καταλάβουμε τη νεολαία…

«Η ανικανότητα να καταλάβουμε τη νεολαία. Θα έπρεπε να είναι η κυρίαρχη συζήτηση, αφετηρία για να σχεδιάσουμε το μέλλον, θα έπρεπε να είναι ο προβληματισμός που αντικαθιστά το καθημερινό κενό και τον ορυμαγδό άχρηστων ειδήσεων.

Αντιθέτως, δεν υπάρχει τίποτε, μόνο κενές κουβέντες και αμήχανη σιωπή. Μια απόλυτη ήττα, η πολλοστή που ζω».

-«Είμαι πολύ ανήσυχος, λυπημένος, φοβισμένος και απογοητευμένος. Περνούν οι δεκαετίες και δεν μαθαίνουμε τίποτε .

Η ευθύνη για όσα συμβαίνουν σήμερα στην Ελλάδα ανήκει εξ ολοκλήρου στην κυβέρνηση και στον πρωθυπουργό Κώστα Καραμανλή.

0204_trilogy_03

Εντυπωσιάζει η επανάληψη της απάντησης, πάντα ίδια από τον καιρό των συνταγματαρχών: μπροστά σε ένα υπαρκτό πρόβλημα εμφανίζονται στη σκηνή τα γκλομπς και τα δακρυγόνα.

Μια χώρα, όταν διαθέτει αντισώματα από το ιστορικό παρελθόν της, χρησιμοποιεί άλλες μεθόδους.

Βλέπω το πρόσωπο αυτού του παιδιού στο έδαφος, του Γρηγορόπουλου, τα δεκαπέντε χρόνια του που πετάχτηκαν, τα όνειρα στο πεζοδρόμιο, τη βία που δεν ξέρει να ακούει παρά μονάχα τη δικιά της λογική.Αυτά είναι στοιχεία που θα προκαλούσαν ανησυχία σε οποιονδήποτε, όχι απλώς σε κάποιον που αγωνίστηκε για τη δημοκρατία».από την εφημερίδα «Ουνιτά» ο Θόδωρος Αγγελόπουλος, με αφορμή τα γεγονότα των ημερών

η συνέντευξη δημοσιεύτηκε στην εφημερίδα ΑΥΓΗ

Αυτό το post αποτελεί αναδημοσίευση απ’το blog

The Uncut’s Store Weblog